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20120901
20120930
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
about specific7o traitors. originally, there was publishing in baltimore, which was a big slave trading town. they had articles about slave traders, one thing that this man was a guy who broke up families and sold off children -- that is what they wrote about. in both cases, the slave traders waylaid them after their article appeared, they beat the heck out of them and then when charges were filed in his case, the judge says he deserved it and dismissed the charges in the case. anderson's case, after beating garrison outcome of the slave trader also charged him with slander and libel. garrison was about to go on trial in baltimore in 1833 and knew that he was not going to get a fair trial, so he skipped town. he left and went back to boston and that's when he found the great anti-slavery publication in the united states. then he wrote an article about a story that was well-known in washington at the time. a black woman was walking across the bridge over the potomac and a constable started chasing her. the constable supplemented income by selling bikes into slavery for the woman ran away
. lundy started doing it, and he taught garrison to do fit. originally, they were publishing in baltimore which was a bigger slave-trading town, so they both wrote articles about different slave trader, one saying this man was a beast because he had sold off children, he had broke] up families -- actually, both of them. that's what they wrote about. and in both cases the slave traders waylaid them after their articles had appeared, beat the hell out of them. and when lundy filed chargings in his case, the judge said, well, you deserved it and dismissed the charges, dismissed the case. in garrison's case, after beating garrison up, the slave trader also charged him with libel. so garrison was about to go on trial in baltimore in 1833 and was, knew that he was not going to get a fair trial, so he skipped town. so he left in 1833, and he went back to boston. and that's when he founded the liberator. and lundy had to leave town as well. key charged him in 1833 with -- lundy wrote an article about, a story that was well known in washington at the time which was black woman was walking across t
. arisen with were publishing in baltimore which was a bigger slave trading town. they both wrote articles about difference led traders temecula, both of them. that is what they wrote about. beat they supplemented there and kim by kidnapping free blacks and selling them into slavery. the woman ran away. two bella the potomac and drowned. so he wrote an article. here's what happened. here's the name of the constable. district attorney is in, to do something about it. congress should. he hit the roof. when on and charged him and his printer, another white man who helped him run of the copies. electronic drive. the anti slavery people up. one to get rid of the antislavery forces. he was facing $1,000 fine. $20,000 to $100,000. so collected one meal from his friends and took off and went to philadelphia. that was key. >> mainstream press. to bring this whole thing. >> there were a lot of papers of the time. three daily newspapers. three different tendencies. now part of washington d.c. the 11 newspapers. there were aligned with political factions in the government. so they would talk about --
are not supposed to say his name because he moved the browns franchise to baltimore city takes that very personally but let me tell you something, hugh hewitt has been so kind and gracious and he is a great friend of mine and we were playing back and forth that he was great to promote tonight's event. he was the driving force behind the library and he is one of the best in the business. he's a great guy. >> why did you stop at 50? >> first edition, first edition. if this book does well we will do a second edition i hope. >> what the's the secret to winning in november? >> we talk about raising the bar. we have to get everybody to vote. i can tell you how many people i meet around the country hard-working people, dishwashero say i've never voted but this is the air have to vote for mitt romney. this is the year i have to vote. the enthusiasm is there. we just have to translate and that into literal votes and i say this all the time. it's very important to me. don't minimize or underestimate the power of prayer. prayer works. [applause] i dedicated "50 things liberals love to hate" to longtime listen
name and where you're from? >> my name's daniel coreturn, and i'm from baltimore,
in baltimore to honor our men and women in uniform from world part to. the time will not dim the glory of their deeds. the same can be said of the heroes and the victims of 9/11. the same can be said of their families, which channeled their grief into action to make america safer, whose commitment of time and generosity of spirit have given all of us strength and made our country stronger. indeed, time will never dim the memory of those who perished, the images of destruction and despair, the moment of pain and anguish, and will never dim the american people's spirit of unity in the wake of the attacks. time will never diminish the courage of our police, firefighters and all the first responders and with the 9/11 bill now all of the land, our country will continue to stand by them, indeed as well as in work. time has left the memories of 9/11 emblazoned on our hard for more than a decade. on this anniversary, and in the years to come, time will continue to tell the true story of 9/11, how the 9/11 families turned a national tragedy into a time of unity. how our country came together wi
baltimore county. she has been a decades long member of people for the american way, and a longtime supporter of amnesty international. she not only thinks globally, but ask locally through city meals with whom she volunteers as a meal deliver in new york city where she lives. [applause] >> turner serves as the chair of the planned parenthood federation of american board of advocates, and has testified before congress on reproductive rights which is your topic here today. besides acting and doing political work, turner is doing one thing, helping keep the spirit of mali allies. she was a newspaper columnist whose wit and passion for politics made her a legend. turner knew her. that's because when former texas governor ann richards was undergoing cancer treatment in manhattan, she happened to move into turner's apartment building. one day i was visiting with richard and they ran into turner. they invited her out for an evening of laughter, tall stories and giving turner a unique appreciation of life and spirit. later when market and go, a journalist known to many of us here in d.c. a
because he moved the franchise to baltimore, so hugh takes that very personally. [laughter] but let me tell you something, hugh hewitt has been so kind and gracious, and he's a great friend of mine. 's great to promote tonight's event. he, of course, was a driving force behind the nixon library, and he's one of my best friends in the -- >> the second question is, why'd you stop at 50? [laughter] >> first edition. if this book does well, we'll do a second edition, i hope. >> next question back here. >> yes, sir. >> yeah, mike, what's the secret to winning in november? >> well, as we talked about raising the bar, you've got to vote. i can't tell you how many people i meet around the country, hard working people, dishwashers, legal immigrants who say i've never voted, but this is the year i have to vote for mitt romney. this is the year i've gotta vote. [applause] the enthusiasm is there, we just have got to translate that into actual, literal votes, and, you know, just -- and i say this all the time, it's very important to me, don't minimize or underestimate the power of prayer. prayer w
you go to school and what did you study? >> guest: i went to public school in part 10 baltimore until the eighth grade. then i went to some boarding schools or very good in massachusetts. eagle brook school, i was there for eighth and ninth grade. best of its kind. in illinois, there were not too many people going off to schools at that time. half of my friends thought i was sent to military school or sent to reform school, which, played on the judgment of my character. either way, 180 kids at the top of the class. then i went to andover massachusetts, which is a spectacular place. they have one of the best in history departments on earth. i went to williams college in massachusetts. the way that happened was actually one of my mentors was a man who passed way too early. he was the headmaster of andover. in those days, you would go see the headmaster and he would say where would you want to go to college or a a lot of my friends wanted to go to this particular college and he said i don't think that's a good reason for you to go anyplace. he said you want he wants to write history book
? >> guest: i went to public school in part 10 baltimore until the eighth grade. then i went to some boarding schools or very good in massachusetts. eagle brook school, i was there for eighth and ninth grade. best of its kind. in illinois, there were not too many people going off to schools at that time. half of my friends thought i was sent to military s and i do not have a half cent to reform school which may have been a judgment of my character. in any case, still there, 180 kids at the top of massachusetts and i went to philips academy, spectacular place then and now. one of the best history department honor and that includes both colleges. college i went to williams college in massachusetts and the way that happened was one of my mentors was ted pfizer who recently passed much too worthy. he was head master and in those days where do you want to go to college and i guess harvard. why that? a lot of my friends want to go there. i don't think that is a good reason to go anyplace. you want to write history books. i think we will send you to williams with 1800 students. you go there you will
you go to school and what did you study? >> guest: i went to public schooln p10 baltimore until the eighth grade. then i went to some boarding schools or very good in massachusetts. eagle brook school, i was there for eighth and ninth grade. best of its kind. in illinois, there were not too many people going off to schools at that time. half of my friends thought i was sent to military school or sent to reform school, which, played on the judgment of my character. either way, 180 kids at the top of the class. then i went to andover massachusetts, which is a spectacular place. they have one of the best in history departments on earth. i went to williams college in massachusetts. the way that happened was actually one of my mentors was a man who passed way too early. he was the headmaster of andover. in those days, you would go see the headmaster and he would say where would you want to go to college or a a lot of my friends wanted to go to this particular college and he said i don't think that's a good reason for you to go anyplace. he said you want he wants to write history book
. >> host: john in baltimore, you are on with -- professor john lewis gaddis. >> caller: i have a question. as a high school instructor i was interested in exporting what you discussed with your reliance on the classics and the new curriculum you have been doing and being your opinion i was wondering which classics do you think could be used to best in for u.s. foreign policy regarding the situation in israel. >> guest: the problem with influencing u.s. foreign policy is policymakers don't read classical works. nobody in government has the time. henry kissinger famously said years ago that policymakers bring into the job the intellectual capital accumulated before they took the job and they draw down on it and that means what they learned in school. our program at yale is not a program of trying to influence current policy in any regard. we are not a think tank or anything like that. we are trying to think about what kinds of books you want the leaders of the country who may not be the leaders of the country for another 30 years what books would you want them to read and that was how we th
,, hello my name is daniel coburn and i am from baltimore, maryland. >> it was fantastic. he has a really top talent. >> it was a book you wanted to read before you came today? >> i actually read it before i came today and he has a new book out that i will be taking up when i get home. >> any other books that do you recommend as well? >> in general, i just finished up the king of gang of thrones book. very entertaining to read. >> with you currently reading now? >> well, i'm going to be picking up the oath. >> here at the 12th annual national book festival on the national mall in washington dc, we are joined by david rubenstein, cochair of the carlyle group and a benefactor of the national book festival. mr. rubin side, with your connection? >> i have been involved with the library of congress for a while. i agreed to put up $5 million to help get funded for the next five years. and so that was my initial contact. subsequently, i provided additional money so it could be a two-day affair. originally it was a one-day event. today is the second day, it's a sunday. that is my connection. >> a
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)